Families & Classification of Chhattisgarhi Brahmins

Families & Classification

These Brahmins are divided into three categories—Paitiha also known as Pankti Paavan meaning who sat in a row; Jatiha or Jaati kula also known as Gangaparin; and Tutiha or Truti kula. The Paitihas are classified into 3 plus 13 homes. The home of 3 consists of disciples of three gotras: Gargya, Gautama, and Shandilya; the Garga rishi and his disciples were the first to study the Yajurveda in their ashrams. After that, Gautama rishi and Shandilya rishi also started to study Yajurveda and Samaveda in their ashrams. The home of 3 is the most highly regarded amongst Saryupareen Brahmins. 13 other rishis learnt these and other branches of the Hindu vedas in their ashrams; and they are known as the home of 13. Similarly, Gangaparin are classified into Vashishta, Krishnatraya, Kashyapa and Bharadwaja gotras and the classification of Tutihas are Parashara, Vashishta, Upamanyu, Sankrithi, Agastya, Kaushika, etc.

The family tree of Saryupareen Brahmins consists of ten branches

  • Shukla,
  • Mishra,
  • Ojha,
  • Dikshit,
  • Dwivedi or Dubey,
  • Pathak,
  • Tripathi or Tiwari,
  • Pandey,
  • Chaturvedi or Chowbey, and
  • Upadhyaya.

The main gotra of Saryupareen Brahmins are 26. Out of these

Tri (three) gotra
  1. Garga,
  2. Gautama
  3. Sandilya

Das (ten) gotra
  1. Kaundilya,
  2. Vashista,
  3. Udbahu,
  4. Upamanyu,
  5. Maunas,
  6. Karna,
  7. Vartatt,
  8. Bhrigu,
  9. Agastya,
  10. Kaumasya and

Terah (thirteen) gotra
  1. Parasara,
  2. Galava,
  3. Kasyapa,
  4. Kaushika,
  5. Bhargava,
  6. Savarnaya,
  7. Atri,
  8. Katyayana
  9. Angira,
  10. Vatsa
  11. Sankritya,
  12. Jamadagni,
  13. Punah.

Other than above three gotras 1. Krishanatraya, 2. Ghritakausika, 3. Margeya are called mishrit (combined) gotra. However, written proof for 261 gotras are found in Vansavali compiled by Ahitagni Shri Yamuna Prasad Ram Tripathi Chaturmasyaji from where the above have been referred. It is also a saying in villages near Saryu river (especially near Ayodhaya) that after lord Ram came back after killing Ravana (a brahmin) he wanted to hold a brahm bhoj (feeding the brahmins a feast), it was the saryupareen brahmins who accepted the invitation, the kankupji brahmins did not attend the feast. That is why Saryupareen and Kankupji usually avoid marrying each other.

There is also a saying in villages near Saryu river (especially near Ayodhaya) that after lord Ram came back after killing Ravana (a brahmin) he wanted to hold a brahm bhoj (feeding the brahmins a feast), it was the saryupareen brahmins who accepted the invitation, the kankupji brahmins did not attend the feast. That is why Saryupareen and Kankupji usually avoid marrying each other.